benjaminllevy:

FRANCOIS NICOLAS CHIFFLART (FRENCH, 1825-1901)

Cholera in Paris, 1865

Etching with drypoint

Plate: 312 x 490 mm. (12 5/16 x 19 5/16 in.)

The Baltimore Museum of Art: Blanche Adler Memorial Fund, 1981.68

(via blackpaint20)

femalebeautyinart:

Lady in Yellow by Max Kurzweil, 1899

(via lostinhistory)

Japanese Origin

Kappas are water demons. They are monkey-like creatures with saucer-shaped heads and long noses. Their main weakness is that their heads are filled with water and if it is spilled they can be easily overcome. They are similar to the Finnish Nakki both are used to scare children of dangers lurking in waters. They have been frequently blamed for drownings. 

(via blackpaint20)

hadrian6:

A Capriccio of Classical Ruins with Figures. 18th.century. attributed to Giovanni Paolo Panini. Italian 1691-1765. oil/canvas.

hadrian6:

The Accident.   Hubert Robert. French 1773-1808. oil/canvas.

magictransistor:

Camille Flammarion, Observatory at Alexandria (L’Astronomie Populaire), 1880.

hadrian6:

Aphrodite Victorious. 19th.century. artist unknown. oil/canvas.

allthingseurope:

St. Stephen’s Cathedral Interior, Vienna (by emilstefanov)

npr:

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.

It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, it was women who pioneered computer programming — but too often, that’s a part of history that even the smartest people don’t know.

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

Photo: Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania

(via lostinhistory)

magictransistor:

Gaspar Schott. Physica Curiosa, Mirabilia Naturæ et Artis. 1662.

(via scientificillustration)